Pharmacology of non sedating antihistamines

Keywords: Cetirizine, desloratadine, fexofenadine, H How to cite this URL: Church MK, Church DS. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2013 [cited 2017 Aug 27];9-24. 2013/58/3/219/110832 Daniel Bovet wrote "Three naturally occurring amines, acetylcholine, epinephrine, and histamine, may be grouped together because they have a similar chemical structure, are all present in the body fluids, and exert characteristically strong pharmacologic activities.

There are alkaloids which interfere with the effects of acetylcholine.

receptor sites, responsible for immediate hypersensitivity reactions such as sneezing and itching.

Members of this class of drugs may also be used for their side effects, including sedation and antiemesis (prevention of nausea and vomiting). They have no effect on rate of histamine release, nor do they inactivate histamine.

Three drugs widely used for symptomatic relief in urticaria, desloratadine, levocetirizine and fexofenadine are highlighted in this review.

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Correspondence Address: Martin K Church Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charit Universittsmedizin Berlin, Charitplatz 1, D 10117 Berlin Germany Source of Support: Martin Church has been a speaker or consultant for Almirall, FAES Pharma, Menarini, MSD, UCB Pharma, Sanofi-Aventis, and Uriach.

Diana Church has no conflict of interest., Conflict of Interest: None antihistamines penetrate readily into the brain to cause sedation, drowsiness, fatigue and impaired concentration and memory causing detrimental effects on learning and examination performance in children and on impairment of the ability of adults to work and drive. The newer second-generation H -antihistamines are safer, cause less sedation and are more efficacious.

These physiological effects are mediated by the histamine type 1 (H1)-receptors, a G-protein coupled receptor situated on the cellular membranes of cells.

Traditionally, antihistamines were viewed as H1-receptor antagonists, where they compete with histamine for the H1-receptor binding sites on tissues, preventing the binding and action of histamine and thereby diminishing the major actions of histamine in the body.

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[ Read the disclaimer | Adults: Allergic rhinitis, seasonal/perennial: 5 mg po qd. In patients with liver or renal impairment, a starting dose of one 5 mg tablet every other day is recommended based on pharmacokinetic data.

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